FAQ and Patient Resources

Clayton Market Dental in Surrey is dedicated to your oral health, comfort and overall convenience. Read more on this page about our frequently asked questions, financing options, and dental recommendations for home.

preventative dentistry

Are Dental X-rays Safe?
We are all exposed to natural radiation in our environment. The amount of radiation exposure from a full mouth series of x-rays is equal to the amount a person receives in a single day from natural sources.

Dental x-rays produce a low level of radiation and are considered safe. Dentists take necessary precautions to limit the patient’s exposure to radiation when taking dental x-rays. These precautions include using lead apron shields to protect the body and using digital radiographs that greatly reduces the exposure time of each x-ray.

How Often Should Dental X-Rays Be Taken?
The need for dental x-rays depends on each patient’s individual dental health needs. Your dentist and dental hygienist will recommend necessary x-rays based on the review of your medical and dental history, dental exam, signs and symptoms, age consideration, and risk for disease.

A full mouth series of dental x-rays is recommended for new patients. A full series is usually good for three to five years. Bite-wing x-rays (x-rays of top and bottom teeth biting together) are taken at recall (check-up) visits and are recommended once or twice a year to detect new dental problems. Panoramic radiographs are recommended to give an overview of the jaws and are particularly useful when examining wisdom teeth or the developing teeth.

cosmetic dentistry

What Does Tooth Whitening Involve?
This type of tooth whitening usually requires two visits. At the first appointment, impressions (molds) will be made of your teeth to fabricate custom, clear plastic, trays.

At your second appointment, you will try on the trays for proper fit, and adjustments will be made if necessary. The trays are worn with special whitening solution either twice a day for 30 minutes or overnight for a couple of weeks depending on the degree of staining and desired level of whitening. It is normal to experience tooth sensitivity during the time you are whitening your teeth, but it will subside shortly after you have stopped bleaching.

You will receive care instructions for your teeth and trays, and be encouraged to visit your dentist regularly to help maintain a beautiful, healthy, white smile.

How Are Composite Fillings Placed?
Composite fillings are usually placed in one appointment. While the tooth is numb, your dentist will remove decay as necessary. The space will then be thoroughly cleaned and carefully prepared before the new filling is placed. If the decay was near the nerve of the tooth, a special medication will be applied for added protection. The composite filling will then be precisely placed, shaped, and polished, restoring your tooth to its original shape and function.

It is normal to experience sensitivity to hot and cold when composite fillings are first placed, however this will subside shortly after your tooth acclimates to the new filling.

You will be given care instructions at the conclusion of your treatment. Good oral hygiene practices, eating habits, and regular dental visits will aid in the life of your new fillings.

What Does Getting Porcelain Veneers Involve?
Getting veneers usually requires two visits to complete the process, with little or no anesthesia required during the procedure. The teeth are prepared by lightly buffing and shaping the surface to allow for the thickness of the veneer. A mold or impression of the teeth is taken and a shade (color) will then be chosen by you and the dentist.

On the second visit the teeth will be cleansed with special liquids to achieve a durable bond. Bonding cement is then placed between the tooth and veneer and a special light beam is used to harden and set the bond.

You will receive care instructions for veneers. Proper brushing, flossing and regular dental visits will aid in the life of your new veneers.

It is normal to experience sensitivity to hot and cold when composite fillings are first placed, however this will subside shortly after your tooth acclimates to the new filling.

You will be given care instructions at the conclusion of your treatment. Good oral hygiene practices, eating habits, and regular dental visits will aid in the life of your new fillings.

What Does Getting a Crown Involve?
A crown procedure usually requires two appointments. Your first appointment will include taking several highly accurate molds (or impressions) that will be used to create your custom crown. A mold will also be used to create a temporary crown which will stay on your tooth for approximately 2 weeks until your new crown is fabricated by a dental laboratory.

While the tooth is numb, the dentist will prepare the tooth by removing any decay and shaping the surface to properly fit the crown. Once these details are accomplished, your temporary crown will be placed with temporary cement and your bite will be checked to ensure you are biting properly.

At your second appointment your temporary crown will be removed, the tooth will be cleaned, and your new crown will be carefully placed to ensure the spacing and bite is accurate.

You will be given care instructions and encouraged to have regular dental visits to check your new crown.

What Does Getting an Inlay Involve?
An inlay procedure usually requires two appointments. Your first appointment will include taking several highly accurate impressions (molds) that will be used to create your custom inlay and a temporary restoration.

While the tooth is numb, the dentist will remove any decay and/or old filling materials. The space will then be thoroughly cleaned and carefully prepared, shaping the surface to properly fit an inlay restoration. A temporary filling will be applied to protect the tooth while your inlay is made by a dental laboratory.

At your second appointment your new inlay will be carefully and precisely cemented into place. A few adjustments may be necessary to ensure a proper fit and that your bite is comfortable.

You will receive care instruction at the conclusion of your treatment. Good oral hygiene practices, a proper diet, and regular dental visits will aid in the life of your new inlay.

What Does Getting an Onlay Involve?
An onlay procedure usually requires two appointments. Your first appointment will include taking several highly accurate impressions (molds) that will be used to create your custom onlay and a temporary restoration.

While the tooth is numb, the dentist will remove any decay and/or old filling materials. The space will then be thoroughly cleaned and carefully prepared, shaping the surface to properly fit an onlay restoration. A temporary filling will be applied to protect the tooth while your onlay is made by a dental laboratory.

At your second appointment, your new onlay will be carefully and precisely cemented into place. A few adjustments may be necessary to ensure a proper fit and that your bite is comfortable.

You will receive care instruction at the conclusion of your treatment. Good oral hygiene practices, a proper diet, and regular dental visits will aid in the life of your new onlay.

general dentistry

What Does Getting a Fixed Bridge Involve?
Getting a bridge usually requires two or more visits. While the teeth are numb, the two anchoring teeth are prepared by removing a portion of enamel to allow for a crown. Next, a highly accurate impression (mold) is made which will be sent to a dental laboratory where the bridge will be fabricated. In addition, a temporary bridge will be made and worn for several weeks until your next appointment.

At the second visit, your permanent bridge will be carefully checked, adjusted, and cemented to achieve a proper fit. Occasionally your dentist may only temporarily cement the bridge, allowing your teeth and tissue time to get used to the new bridge. The new bridge will be permanently cemented at a later time.

You will receive care instructions at the conclusion of your treatment. Proper brushing, flossing and regular dental visits will aid in the life of your new permanent bridge.

gum disease

What Is Gum Disease?
Gum Disease (Periodontal disease) is an infection of the tissues that support the teeth.

Teeth are supported by the gums, or gingiva. A tooth’s root is anchored to its socket by fibers called periodontal ligaments.

The gums do not attach to the teeth as firmly as one might think. A shallow, V-shaped gap called a sulcus exists between the teeth and the gums. Periodontal Disease (gum disease) affects this gap. Eventually, in periodontal disease, the tissues supporting the tooth break down. If only the gums are involved in this breakdown, the disease is called gingivitis. If only the connecting tissues and bone are involved, it is called periodontitis.

financial policies

Dental care is an investment in your health and well-being. To help alleviate any financial stress, we are happy to provide estimates in advance of any treatment. There may be variables or surprises in the dental process which we will do our best to determine before starting treatment. As a result, costs and time of treatment may very from the initial estimate. We will then offer you a revised plan and financial estimate.

We will work with you and your insurance company to ensure that you get the greatest possible benefit from your plan. It is important that you notify us of any changes in your plan or your address. Your insurance plan is a contract between you, your employer and the insurance company. Insurance companies will not provide us information directly.

At time of treatment, you will be responsible for any portion not covered by your insurance plan.

We accept cash, debit, Visa or MasterCard payment which is expected at time of treatment. For larger procedures we can establish payment plans which may be arranged with our office administrator, Lisa. We accept most in-province dental plans and will assist you in understanding your benefits. However, any and all amounts not covered by your insurance plans are ultimately your responsibility.

dental care at home

A beautiful, healthy smile that lasts a lifetime is our ultimate goal for you. Your personal home care plays an important role in achieving that goal. It starts at home by eating balanced meals, reducing the number of snacks you eat and correctly using the various dental aids that help control the plaque and bacteria that cause dental disease.

Tooth Brushing
Brush your teeth at least twice a day (especially before going to bed at night) with a Canadian Dental Association approved soft bristle brush and toothpaste.

  • Place the brush at a 45-degree angle to the gums and gently brush using a small, circular motion, ensuring that you always feel the bristles on the gums.
  • Brush the outer, inner, and biting surfaces of each tooth.
  • Use the tip of the brush to clean the inside of your front teeth.
  • Brush your tongue to remove bacteria and freshen your breath.


Electric toothbrushes are also recommended. They are easy to use and can remove plaque efficiently. Simply place the bristles of the electric brush on your gums and teeth and allow the brush to do its job, several teeth at a time.

Flossing
Daily flossing is the best way to clean between the teeth and under the gum line.

Flossing cleans spaces, and prevents plaque colonies from building up.

  • Take 12-16 inches (30-40 cm) of dental floss and wrap it around your middle fingers, leaving about 2 inches (5 cm) of floss between your hands.
  • Using your thumbs and forefingers to guide the floss, gently insert the floss between teeth using a gentle sawing motion.
  • Curve the floss into a “C” shape around each tooth and under the gum line. Gently move the floss up and down, cleaning the side of each tooth.


Floss holders are recommended if you have difficulty using conventional floss.

Rinsing
It is important to rinse your mouth with water after brushing, and also after meals if you are unable to brush. If you are using an over-the-counter product for rinsing, it’s a good idea to ask your dentist or dental hygienist whether it’s right for you.

Other dental aids may be recommended by your dentist or dental hygienist:

  • Interdental brushes
  • Rubber tip stimulators
  • Tongue cleaners
  • Irrigation devices
  • Fluoride
  • Medicated rinses


New patients are always welcome. Contact Clayton Market Dental today.

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INFORMATION

Clayton Market Dental

105A-19151 Fraser Hwy

Surrey, BC Canada

V3S 7H2

Phone: 604-372-0755

Fax: 604-372-0756

Email: info@claytonmarketdental.com


SERVICE AREA

Langley & Surrey (neighborhoods of Cloverdale and Clayton)

HOURS

Monday: 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM
Tuesday: 11:00 AM – 7:00 PM
Wednesday: 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM
Thursday: Closed
Friday: Closed
Saturday: 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM
Sunday: Closed

We will be open on Thursdays starting in mid-September.

PROFESSIONAL AFFILIATIONS

British Columbia Dental Association Canadian Dental Association College of Dental Surgeons of British Columbia

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